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Upcoming Funding Deadlines

*Grants that Accept Proposals at Anytime

June

Conservation, Food and Health Foundation

Conservation, Food and Health Foundation Grants Program

    Concept Application Deadlines: January 1, July 1

    Proposal Invitations: February 1, August 1

    Proposal Deadline: March 1, September 3

    Grant Awards: June 1, December 1

Project Description: Incorporated in 1985, the Conservation, Food and Health Foundation seeks to promote the conservation of natural resources, improve the production and distribution of food, and improve health in the developing world. The foundation helps build capacity within developing countries in its three areas of interest with grants that support research or projects that solve specific problems.

The foundation supports projects that demonstrate strong local leadership, promote professional development in the conservation, agricultural, and health sciences; develop the capacity of local organizations; and address a particular problem in the field. It prefers to support projects addressing under-funded issues and geographic areas.


SRC GRC

Semiconductor Research Corporation: Governance, Risk and Compliance (GRC)

    Call for White Papers in Hardware Security (HWS): Due April 30, 2020 by 3:00 PM EDT / 12:00P PM PDT

    Artificial Intelligence Hardware (AIHW): May 27, 2020

    Analog/Mixed-Signal Circuits, Systems, and Devices (AMS-CSD): June 1, 2020

    Logic and Memory Devices (LMD): June 1, 2020

    Nanomanufacturing Materials and Processes (NMP): June 1, 2020

Project Description: As a mission-driven research consortium, GRC funds research to address a member-defined research agenda. GRC addresses the broader agenda of the industry through core research, and the specific research agenda of individual members through custom research. While selections of core research projects are made by member community representatives familiar with the technical area in focus, selection of custom research projects are made by individual, eligible member companies. Custom research currently comprises about one-fifth of the overall research budget.

GRC may issue a call for white papers; promising projects result in requests for proposal. The typical result of a successful research proposal is a multi-year research contract with an initial 12-month funding term. At the end of the research contract period, researchers may re-compete for new support. Alternatively, GRC may issue a call for grant applications; in this case, successful submissions are funded as grants.


NSF: SBIR

Small Business Innovation Research Program Phase I

Full Proposal Windows:

    3/6/20-6/4/20

    6/5/20-9/3/20

    9/4/20-12/3/20

Small businesses can submit a Project Pitch at any time. Small businesses that have been invited to submit a full proposal can submit a proposal based on that Project Pitch at any time during one of the submission windows listed above.

Project Description: The SBIR program is intended to support scientific excellence and technological innovation through the investment of federal research funds to build a strong national economy by stimulating technological innovation in the private sector; strengthening the role of small business in meeting federal research and development needs; increasing the commercial application of federally supported research results; and fostering and encouraging participation by socially and economically disadvantaged and women-owned small businesses.

The SBIR program at NSF solicits proposals from the small business sector consistent with NSF's mission to promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; and to secure the national defense.

The program is governed  by Public Law 114-328 (SBIR/STTR Reauthorization Act of 2017). SBIR/STTR policy is provided by the Small Business Administration (SBA) through the SBIR Policy Directive. A main purpose of the legislation is to stimulate technological innovation and increase private sector commercialization. The NSF SBIR/STTR program is therefore in a unique position to meet both the goals of NSF and the purpose of the SBIR/STTR legislation by transforming scientific discovery and innovation into both social and economic benefit, and by emphasizing private sector commercialization.

Because the program has no topical or procurement focus, the NSF offers very broad solicitation topics that are intended to encourage as many eligible science- and technology-based small businesses as possible to compete for funding. The topics are detailed on the program website. In many cases, the program is also open to proposals focusing on technical and market areas not explicitly noted in the aforementioned topics.


NSF: STTR

Small Business Technology Transfer Program Phase I

Full Proposal Deadline:

    3/6/20-6/4/20

    6/5/20-9/3/20

    9/4/20-12/3/20

Small businesses can submit a Project Pitch at any time. Small businesses that have been invited to submit a full proposal can submit a proposal based on that Project Pitch at any time during one of the submission windows listed above.

Project Description: The STTR program is intended to support scientific excellence and technological innovation through the investment of federal research funds to build a strong national economy by stimulating technological innovation in the private sector; strengthening the role of small business in meeting federal research and development needs; increasing the commercial application of federally supported research results; and fostering and encouraging participation by socially and economically disadvantaged and women-owned small businesses.

The STTR program at NSF solicits proposals from the small business sector consistent with NSF's mission to promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; and to secure the national defense.

Because the program has no topical or procurement focus, the NSF offers very broad solicitation topics that are intended to encourage as many eligible science- and technology-based small businesses as possible to compete for funding. The topics are detailed on the program website. In many cases, the program is also open to proposals focusing on technical and market areas not explicitly noted in the aforementioned topics.


NSF: TCUP

Tribal Colleges and Universities Program (TCUP)

    Preparing for TCUP Implementation: 9/9/20

    TCU Enterprise Advancement Centers (TEA Centers): 3/7/20 - 6/4/20

    Partnerships in Geoscience Education: 9/4/20

    Instructional Capacity Excellence in TCUP Institutions: 9/10/20 - 9/9/2021

    Targeted STEM Infusion Projects: 12/10/2020

    SEA-PHAGES in TCUs: 6/10/20; 6/10 Annually Thereafter

Project Description: A new funding track, Partnerships for Documentary Linguistics Education (PADLE), is offered collaboratively by this program and the Documenting Endangered Languages program (DEL) in the Directorate for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences (SBE). The strand provides support for collaborations that will improve TCUP institutions' instructional capacity in documentary linguistics (descriptive linguistics, computational methodology, archiving and preservation); attract, retain and support TCUP students in internships and research endeavors deemed to be necessary for a complete curriculum offering; and engage partner universities to provide an academic grounding and a successful transition for students who wish to study or attain degrees in documentary linguistics.


NSF: FM

Future Manufacturing

    LOI: 4/10/20

    Full Proposal deadline: 06/05/20

Project Description: As stated in the Strategy for American Leadership in Advanced Manufacturing, worldwide competition in manufacturing has been dominated in recent decades by the maturation, commoditization, and widespread application of computation in production equipment and logistics, effectively leveling the global technological playing field and putting a premium on low wages and incremental technical improvements.[1] The next generation of technological competition in manufacturing will be dictated by inventions of new materials, chemicals, devices, systems, processes, machines, design and work methods, social structures and business practices. Fundamental research will be required in robotics, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, materials science, sustainability, education and public policy, and workforce development to take the lead in this global competition. The research supported under this solicitation will enhance U.S. leadership in manufacturing far into the future by providing new capabilities for established companies and entrepreneurs, improving our health and quality of life, and reducing the impact of manufacturing industries on the environment.

The goal of this solicitation is to support fundamental research and education of a future workforce that will enable Future Manufacturing: manufacturing that either does not exist today or exists only at such small scales that it is not viable. Future Manufacturing will require the design and deployment of diverse new technologies for synthesis and sensing, and new algorithms for manufacturing new materials, chemicals, devices, components and systems. It will require new advances in artificial intelligence and machine learning, new cyber infrastructure, new approaches for mathematical and computational modeling, new dynamics and control methodologies, new ways to integrate systems biology, synthetic biology and bioprocessing, and new ways to influence the economy, workforce, human behavior, and society.

Among this array of technologies and potential research subjects, three thrust areas have been identified for support in FY 2020 under this solicitation: Future Cyber Manufacturing Research, Future Eco Manufacturing Research, and Future Biomanufacturing Research. This solicitation seeks proposals to perform fundamental research to enable new manufacturing capabilities in one or more of these thrust areas. It will support the following three award tracks:

    Future Manufacturing Research Grants (FMRG) - Two types of awards will be supported in FY 2020:

    1. Type I: $500,000 to $750,000 per year for up to five years.
    2. Type II: $750,000 to $2,000,000 per year for up to five years.

    Future Manufacturing Seed Grants (FMSG) - Awards in this track will provide support for up to two years at a level not to exceed $250,000 per year.

    Future Manufacturing Networks (FMNet) - Awards in this track will provide up to five years of support at a total amount of $500,000.

Interdisciplinary teams commensurate with the scope of the proposed research, education plan, and budget are required. Proposals must include demonstrated expertise among the team members to carry out the proposed research, education, and workforce development activities. The use of a convergence approach is expected[2].

The goal of this solicitation is to enable new manufacturing that represents a significant change from current practice. Therefore, proposers responding to this solicitation must include within the Project Description a section titled Enabling Future Manufacturing. Please see "Full Proposal Preparation Instructions" for additional details.

Realization of the benefits of the fundamental research supported under this solicitation will require the simultaneous education of a skilled technical workforce that can transition new discoveries into U.S. manufacturing companies. The National Science Board has recently emphasized this perspective in its report, "THE SKLLED TECHNICAL WORKFORCE: Crafting America's Science and Engineering Enterprise."[3] Therefore, proposers responding to this solicitation must include within the Project Description a section titled Education and Workforce Development Plan that describes plans to equip students and upskill the workforce to enable Future Manufacturing. Please see "Full Proposal Preparation Instructions" for additional details.


NSF: IUCRC

Industry-University Cooperative Research Centers Program (IUCRC)

    Sponsor pre-proposal deadlines:

    • 10/16/20, Third Wednesday in October annually thereafter
    • 04/21/21, Third Wednesday in April annually thereafter

    Sponsor full proposal deadline:

    • 6/17/20, Third Wednesday in June annually thereafter
    • 12/18/20, Third Wednesday in December annually thereafter

Project Description: The Industry-University Cooperative Research Centers (IUCRC) program develops long-term partnerships among industry, academe, and government. The Centers are catalyzed by an investment from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and are primarily supported by industry Center members, with NSF taking a supporting role in the development and evolution of the Center. Each Center is established to conduct research that is of interest to both the industry members and the Center faculty. An IUCRC contributes to the nation's research infrastructure base and enhances the intellectual capacity of the engineering and science workforce through the integration of research and education. As appropriate, an IUCRC uses international collaborations to advance these goals within the global context.


William T. Grant Foundation

William T. Grant Scholars Grant

    Campus Pre-Proposal deadline: May 27, 2020; (Use this form for W.T. Grant Scholars preproposal submission)

    W.T. Grant Online Application Opens: Mid-May 2020

    Mentor and Reference Letter Deadline: June 19, 2020, 5:00 PM EST

    Application Deadline: July 1, 2020, 3:00 PM EST

    Announcement of Awards: March 2021

Project Description: The William T. Grant Scholars Program supports career development for promising early-career researchers. The program funds five-year research and mentoring plans that significantly expand researchers’ expertise in new disciplines, methods, and content areas.

Applicants should have a track record of conducting high-quality research and an interest in pursuing a significant shift in their trajectories as researchers. We recognize that earlycareer researchers are rarely given incentives or support to take measured risks in their work, so this award includes a mentoring component, as well as a supportive academic community.

Awards are based on applicants’ potential to become influential researchers, as well as their plans to expand their expertise in new and significant ways. The application should make a cohesive argument for how the applicant will expand his or her expertise. The research plan should evolve in conjunction with the development of new expertise, and the mentoring plan should describe how the proposed mentors will support applicants in acquiring that expertise. Proposed research plans must address questions that are relevant to policy and practice in the Foundation’s focus areas.


*Grants that Accept Proposals at Anytime