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Upcoming Funding Deadlines

*Grants that Accept Proposals at Anytime

July

NSF is encouraging submission of proposals related to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), as described in the March 4, 2020 Dear Colleague Letter (shown below):

NSF Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Research

In light of the emergence and spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the United States and abroad, the National Science Foundation (NSF) is accepting proposals to conduct non-medical, non-clinical-care research that can be used immediately to explore how to model and understand the spread of COVID-19, to inform and educate about the science of virus transmission and prevention, and to encourage the development of processes and actions to address this global challenge.

NSF encourages the research community to respond to this challenge through existing funding opportunities. In addition, we invite researchers to use the Rapid Response Research (RAPID) funding mechanism, which allows NSF to receive and review proposals having a severe urgency with regard to availability of or access to data, facilities or specialized equipment as well as quick-response research on natural or anthropogenic disasters and similar unanticipated events. Requests for RAPID proposals may be for up to $200K and up to one year in duration. Well-justified proposals that exceed these limits may be entertained. All questions should be directed either to a program officer managing an NSF program with which the research would be aligned or to rapid-covid19@nsf.gov.

Complete guidance on submitting a RAPID proposal may be found in Chapter II.E.1 of the NSF Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide.

We ask that all investigators and organizations maintain awareness of the dynamic nature of this event through regular monitoring of official communications from the Centers for Disease Control and World Health Organization.

NSF has also provided Frequently Asked Questions that address questions associated with NSF proposal submission and award management relevant to research proposals relating to COVID-19 as well as possible impacts of COVID-19 on activities under existing awards and on participation in NSF's merit review panels; that website will be updated as appropriate.

NSF Department of Undergraduate Education Coronavirus Research

NSF's Department of Undergraduate Education (DUE) is specifically interested in research on the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on undergraduate education.  The outbreak has altered undergraduate education in unforeseen ways, including forcing temporary closures and unplanned switches to online classes.  DUE thinks that research about the impacts of such responses on students and educators could provide important new knowledge about STEM learning, virtual learning environments, the impact of stress on learning, and many other important topics.

If you are engaged in such research or would like to do so, we encourage you to consider submitting a proposal to any of our relevant funding programs including:

(See https://www.nsf.gov/funding/programs.jsp?org=DUE)

Alternatively (or in addition), if you have an urgent research need or opportunity, you may consider submitting proposals via the following funding mechanisms:

  1. Submit a Rapid Response Research (RAPID) proposal. See Chapter II.E.1 of the NSF Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide
  2. Request supplemental support for your existing award. See Chapter VI.E.4 of the NSF Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide
  3. Organize a conference or workshop. See Chapter II.E.7 of the NSF Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide

Possible topics of interest for these funding mechanisms include, but are not limited to, research on  the effectiveness of switching from an in-person to a completely online educational format and research on how the outbreak affects student attitudes, interests, and performance in STEM.

Important: Please contact a program officer to explore whether your needs might be appropriate for funding via the RAPID, Supplemental Support, or Conference mechanisms. A list of DUE staff is available at https://www.nsf.gov/staff/staff_list.jsp?org=DUE&from_org=DUE.


NSF: EPSCoR RII-Track 1

Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research: Research Infrastructure Improvement Program (RII): Track 1

    Letter of Intent: 07/01/20

    Full Proposal deadline: 08/03/20

Project Description: The Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) is designed to fulfill the mandate of the National Science Foundation (NSF) to promote scientific progress nationwide. Jurisdictions are eligible to participate in the NSF EPSCoR Research Infrastructure Improvement Program (RII) based on their level of NSF research support averaged over three years (see RII eligibility). Through this program, NSF facilitates the establishment of partnerships among government, higher education, and industry that are designed to effect sustainable improvements in a jurisdiction's research infrastructure, Research and Development (R&D) capacity, and hence, its R&D competitiveness.

Research Infrastructure Improvement Track-1 (RII Track-1) awards provide up to $20 million total over five years to support research-driven improvements to jurisdictions’ physical and cyber infrastructure and human capital development in topical areas selected by the jurisdiction's EPSCoR steering committee as having the best potential to improve future R&D competitiveness. The project’s research activities must align with the specific research priorities identified in the submitting jurisdiction’s approved Science and Technology (S&T) Plan. Refer to Sections II and V.A.4.1 below for more information on alignment of the research activities of the project with the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) research priorities of the S&T Plan.


NSF: SBIR

Small Business Innovation Research Program Phase I

Full Proposal Windows:

    3/6/20-6/4/20

    6/5/20-9/3/20

    9/4/20-12/3/20

Small businesses can submit a Project Pitch at any time. Small businesses that have been invited to submit a full proposal can submit a proposal based on that Project Pitch at any time during one of the submission windows listed above.

Project Description: The SBIR program is intended to support scientific excellence and technological innovation through the investment of federal research funds to build a strong national economy by stimulating technological innovation in the private sector; strengthening the role of small business in meeting federal research and development needs; increasing the commercial application of federally supported research results; and fostering and encouraging participation by socially and economically disadvantaged and women-owned small businesses.

The SBIR program at NSF solicits proposals from the small business sector consistent with NSF's mission to promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; and to secure the national defense.

The program is governed  by Public Law 114-328 (SBIR/STTR Reauthorization Act of 2017). SBIR/STTR policy is provided by the Small Business Administration (SBA) through the SBIR Policy Directive. A main purpose of the legislation is to stimulate technological innovation and increase private sector commercialization. The NSF SBIR/STTR program is therefore in a unique position to meet both the goals of NSF and the purpose of the SBIR/STTR legislation by transforming scientific discovery and innovation into both social and economic benefit, and by emphasizing private sector commercialization.

Because the program has no topical or procurement focus, the NSF offers very broad solicitation topics that are intended to encourage as many eligible science- and technology-based small businesses as possible to compete for funding. The topics are detailed on the program website. In many cases, the program is also open to proposals focusing on technical and market areas not explicitly noted in the aforementioned topics.


NSF: STTR

Small Business Technology Transfer Program Phase I

Full Proposal Deadline:

    3/6/20-6/4/20

    6/5/20-9/3/20

    9/4/20-12/3/20

Small businesses can submit a Project Pitch at any time. Small businesses that have been invited to submit a full proposal can submit a proposal based on that Project Pitch at any time during one of the submission windows listed above.

Project Description: The STTR program is intended to support scientific excellence and technological innovation through the investment of federal research funds to build a strong national economy by stimulating technological innovation in the private sector; strengthening the role of small business in meeting federal research and development needs; increasing the commercial application of federally supported research results; and fostering and encouraging participation by socially and economically disadvantaged and women-owned small businesses.

The STTR program at NSF solicits proposals from the small business sector consistent with NSF's mission to promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; and to secure the national defense.

Because the program has no topical or procurement focus, the NSF offers very broad solicitation topics that are intended to encourage as many eligible science- and technology-based small businesses as possible to compete for funding. The topics are detailed on the program website. In many cases, the program is also open to proposals focusing on technical and market areas not explicitly noted in the aforementioned topics.


William T. Grant Foundation

William T. Grant Scholars Grant

    Campus Pre-Proposal deadline: May 27, 2020; (Use this form for W.T. Grant Scholars preproposal submission)

    W.T. Grant Online Application Opens: Mid-May 2020

    Mentor and Reference Letter Deadline: June 19, 2020, 5:00 PM EST

    Application Deadline: July 1, 2020, 3:00 PM EST

    Announcement of Awards: March 2021

Project Description: The William T. Grant Scholars Program supports career development for promising early-career researchers. The program funds five-year research and mentoring plans that significantly expand researchers’ expertise in new disciplines, methods, and content areas.

Applicants should have a track record of conducting high-quality research and an interest in pursuing a significant shift in their trajectories as researchers. We recognize that earlycareer researchers are rarely given incentives or support to take measured risks in their work, so this award includes a mentoring component, as well as a supportive academic community.

Awards are based on applicants’ potential to become influential researchers, as well as their plans to expand their expertise in new and significant ways. The application should make a cohesive argument for how the applicant will expand his or her expertise. The research plan should evolve in conjunction with the development of new expertise, and the mentoring plan should describe how the proposed mentors will support applicants in acquiring that expertise. Proposed research plans must address questions that are relevant to policy and practice in the Foundation’s focus areas.


NSF: ERVA

Engineering Research Visioning Alliance (ERVA): Future Research Directions for the Engineering Research Community

    LOI: 07/08/20

    Full Proposal deadline: 08/12/20

Project Description: The National Science Foundation Directorate for Engineering (NSF/ENG) invites the engineering research community to establish an organization that will serve to identify and develop bold and societally impactful new engineering research directions and thereby catalyze the engineering research community's pursuit of innovative, high-impact research. Specifically, NSF/ENG calls on the engineering research community to establish an Engineering Research Visioning Alliance (ERVA) that ENG will support to facilitate the articulation of compelling research visions that align with national and global challenges. This organization will be charged with obtaining and integrating input from all stakeholders with interest in engineering research, including academia, industry, societies, government agencies and the public. A reciprocal goal of the organization will be to communicate coordinated information on nascent opportunities and priorities in engineering research to these stakeholders. It is anticipated that through its activities, ERVA will strengthen connectivity across these diverse stakeholders, and increase coordination among engineering disciplinary communities.

The ERVA should have membership/representation of academic, industrial and other stakeholders, and should be inclusive of all engineering disciplines. Through its proposed activities, the ERVA should provide the engineering community with a process for identifying future research challenges and enable the engineering research community to speak with a unified voice.

FURTHER INFORMATION: An informational webinar will be presented on Wednesday, March 25th at 1:00pm Eastern to discuss the ERVA solicitation and answer questions. Details on how to join this webinar will be posted on the NSF/Engineering website (https://www.nsf.gov/dir/index.jsp?org=ENG).


NSF: PFI

Partnerships for Innovation

    Campus Pre-Proposal (only for PFI-RP track): 4/16/20, via this form.

    Full Proposal deadline: 7/8/20; 7/14/21 (second Wednesday in July annually thereafter)

    Full Proposal deadline: 01/13/21; 1/12/22 (second Wednesday in January annually thereafter)

Project Description: The Partnerships for Innovation (PFI) Program within the Division of Industrial Innovation and Partnerships (IIP) offers researchers from all disciplines of science and engineering funded by NSF the opportunity to perform translational research and technology development, catalyze partnerships and accelerate the transition of discoveries from the laboratory to the marketplace for societal benefit.

PFI has five broad goals, as set forth by the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act of 2017 (“the Act”, S.3084 — 114th CongressSec. 602. Translational Research Grants): (1) identifying and supporting NSF-sponsored research and technologies that have the potential for accelerated commercialization; (2) supporting prior or current NSF-sponsored investigators, institutions of higher education, and non-profit organizations that partner with an institution of higher education in undertaking proof-of-concept work, including the development of technology prototypes that are derived from NSF-sponsored research and have potential market value; (3) promoting sustainable partnerships between NSF-funded institutions, industry, and other organizations within academia and the private sector with the purpose of accelerating the transfer of technology; (4) developing multi-disciplinary innovation ecosystems which involve and are responsive to the specific needs of academia and industry; (5) providing professional development, mentoring, and advice in entrepreneurship, project management, and technology and business development to innovators.

In addition, PFI responds to the mandate set by Congress in Section 601(c)(3) of the Act (Follow-on Grants), to support prototype or proof-of-concept development work by participants, including I-Corps participants, with innovations that because of the early stage of development are not eligible to participate in a Small Business Innovation Research Program or a Small Business Technology Transfer Program.

Finally, PFI seeks to implement the mandate set by Congress in Section 102(c)(a) of the Act (Broader Impacts Review Criterion Update) by enhancing partnerships between academia and industry in the United States, and expanding the participation of women and individuals from underrepresented groups in innovation, technology translation, and entrepreneurship.

This solicitation offers two broad tracks for proposals in pursuit of the aforementioned goals: (The limit on the number of proposals submitted by an eligible organization has been eliminated for the PFI-TT track. However, an organization may submit no more than one (1) proposal to the PFI-RP track per submission deadline.)

The Technology Translation (PFI-TT) track offers the opportunity to translate prior NSF-funded research results in any field of science or engineering into technological innovations with promising commercial potential and societal impact. PFI-TT supports commercial potential demonstration projects for academic research outputs in any NSF-funded science and engineering discipline. This demonstration is achieved through proof-of-concept, prototyping, technology development and/or scale-up work. Concurrently, students and postdoctoral researchers who participate in PFI-TT projects receive education and leadership training in innovation and entrepreneurship. Successful PFI-TT projects generate technology-driven commercialization outcomes that address societal needs.

The Research Partnerships (PFI-RP) track seeks to achieve the same goals as the PFI-TT track by supporting instead complex, multi-faceted technology development projects that are typically beyond the scope of a single researcher or institution and require a multi-organizational, interdisciplinary, synergistic collaboration. A PFI-RP project requires the creation of partnerships between academic researchers and third-party organizations such as industry, non-academic research organizations, federal laboratories, public or non-profit technology transfer organizations or other universities. Such partnerships are needed to conduct applied research on a stand-alone larger project toward commercialization and societal impact. In the absence of such synergistic partnership, the project’s likelihood for success would be minimal.

The intended outcomes of both PFI-TT and PFI-RP tracks are: a) the commercialization of new intellectual property derived from NSF-funded research outputs; b) the creation of new or broader collaborations with industry (including increased corporate sponsored research); c) the licensing of NSF-funded research outputs to third party corporations or to start-up companies funded by a PFI team; and d) the training of future innovation and entrepreneurship leaders.

WEBINARS: Webinars will be held to answer questions about the solicitation. Registration will be available on the NSF Partnerships for Innovation website (https://www.nsf.gov/PFI). Potential proposers and their partners are encouraged to attend.


Ray C. Anderson Foundation

NextGen 2020 Grant

    Executive Summary Submission Deadline: 5/15/2020

    Invited Second Phase Full Proposal Submission Deadline: July 10, 2020

    Finalists Notification Date: TBD

    Decision Date: By 12/15/2020

Project Description: The Ray C. Anderson Foundation NextGen Committee requests proposals that would measurably reduce existing or avoid future emissions of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Building upon the success of the past two years of similar grantmaking, and with the desire to increase the breadth of quality proposals, the Committee is issuing a new call for proposals for one $100,000 grant that can help to reverse global warming.


NIH: T32

PAR-19-036: Medical Scientist Training Program (T32)

    Campus Pre-Proposal Deadline: 7/12/19, via this form

    Application Deadline: May 25, 2020; September 25, 2020; January 25, 2021

    Note: Applicants should check with the relevant Institute or Center (IC), since some do not accept T series applications for all three receipt/review/award cycles. Applicants should refer to the IC Table of Contacts for information for each IC's scientific/research contact for the NRSA T32 program..

Program Description: The goal of the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) is to develop a diverse pool of highly trained physician-scientist leaders available to meet the Nation’s biomedical research needs. Specifically, this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) provides support to eligible domestic institutions to develop and implement effective, evidence-based approaches to integrated dual-degree training leading to the award of both clinical degrees, e.g., M.D., D.O., D.V.M., D.D.S., and research doctorate degrees (Ph.D. or equivalent). With the dual qualification of rigorous scientific research and clinical practice, graduates will be equipped with the skills to develop research programs that accelerate the translation of research advances to the understanding, detection, treatment and prevention of human disease, and to lead the advancement of biomedical research. Areas of particular importance to NIGMS are the iterative optimization of MSTP training efficacy and efficiency, fostering the persistence of MSTP alumni in research careers, and enhancing the diversity of the physician-scientist workforce. NIGMS expects that the proposed research training programs will incorporate didactic, research, mentoring and career development elements to prepare trainees for careers that will have a significant impact on the health-related research needs of the Nation.

This FOA does not allow appointed trainees to lead an independent clinical trial but does allow them to obtain research experience in a clinical trial led by a mentor or co-mentor.


NSF: LEAP HI

Leading Engineering for America's Prosperity, Health, and Infrastructure (LEAP HI)

    Letter of Intent: 7/15/20; July 15 annually thereafter

    Full Proposal Window: 9/1/20–9/15/20; September 1–September 15 annually thereafter

Project Description: The LEAP HI program challenges the engineering research community to take a leadership role in addressing demanding, urgent, and consequential challenges for advancing America’s prosperity, health and infrastructure.  LEAP HI proposals confront engineering problems that are too complex to yield to the efforts of a single investigator—problems that require sustained and coordinated effort from interdisciplinary research teams, with goals that are not achievable through a series of smaller, short-term projects.  LEAP HI projects perform fundamental research that may lead to disruptive technologies and methods, lay the foundation for new and strengthened industries, enable notable improvements in quality of life, or reimagine and revitalize the built environment.


NSF: CAREER

Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER)

    7/27/20; 7/26/21 (Fourth Monday in July, Annually Thereafter)

Program Description: CAREER: The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards in support of early-career faculty who have the potential to serve as academic role models in research and education and to lead advances in the mission of their department or organization. Activities pursued by early-career faculty should build a firm foundation for a lifetime of leadership in integrating education and research. NSF encourages submission of CAREER proposals from early-career faculty at all CAREER-eligible organizations and especially encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, and persons with disabilities to apply.

PECASE: Each year NSF selects nominees for the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) from among the most meritorious recent CAREER awardees. Selection for this award is based on two important criteria: 1) innovative research at the frontiers of science and technology that is relevant to the mission of NSF, and 2) community service demonstrated through scientific leadership, education, or community outreach. These awards foster innovative developments in science and technology, increase awareness of careers in science and engineering, give recognition to the scientific missions of the participating agencies, enhance connections between fundamental research and national goals, and highlight the importance of science and technology for the Nation’s future. Individuals cannot apply for PECASE. These awards are initiated by the participating federal agencies. At NSF, up to twenty nominees for this award are selected each year from among the PECASE-eligible CAREER awardees most likely to become the leaders of academic research and education in the twenty-first century. The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy makes the final selection and announcement of the awardees.


NSF: HBCU-UP

Historically Black Colleges and Universities - Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP)

  • Research Initiation Awards and Excellence in Research Projects:
    • Letter of Intent: 7/28/20, fourth Tuesday in July, annually thereafter

      Full Proposal: 10/6/20, first Tuesday in October, annually thereafter

  • Targeted Infusion Projects, Broadening Participation Research Projects, Implementation Projects, ACE Implementation Projects:
    • Letter of Intent: 9/1/20, first Tuesday in September, annually thereafter

      Full Proposal: 11/24/20, fourth Tuesday in November, annually thereafter

Program Description: HBCU-UP provides awards to strengthen STEM undergraduate education and research at HBCUs. Support is available through the following tracks: 

  • Targeted Infusion Projects (TIP), which provide support to achieve a short-term, well-defined goal for improving the quality of undergraduate STEM education at HBCUs.
  • Broadening Participation Research (BPR) in STEM Education projects, which provide support for research that seeks to create and study new theory-driven models and innovations related to the participation and success of underrepresented groups in STEM undergraduate education. 
  • Research Initiation Awards (RIA), which provide support for STEM faculty with no prior or recent research funding to pursue research at the home institution, a NSF-funded research center, a research intensive institution, or a national laboratory.
  • Implementation Projects (IMP), which provide support to design, implement, study, and assess comprehensive institutional efforts for increasing the number of students receiving undergraduate degrees in STEM and enhancing the quality of their preparation by strengthening STEM education and research. Within this track, Achieving Competitive Excellence (ACE) Implementation Projects are intended for HBCUs with exemplary achievements and established institutionalized foundations from previous Implementation Project grants.
  • Broadening Participation Research Centers (BPRC), which provide support to conduct broadening participation research at institutions that have held three rounds of Implementation or ACE Implementation Projects and with demonstrated capability to conduct broadening participation research. Broadening Participation Research Centers are expected to represent the collective intelligence of HBCU STEM higher education, and serve as national hubs for the rigorous study and broad dissemination of the critical pedagogies and culturally sensitive interventions that contribute to the success of HBCUs in educating African American STEM undergraduates. Centers are expected to conduct research on STEM education and broadening participation in STEM; perform outreach to HBCUs in order to build capacity for conducting this type of research; and work to disseminate promising broadening participation research in order to enhance STEM education and research outcomes for African American undergraduates across the country.
  • Other Funding Opportunities include EArly-Concept Grants for Exploratory Research (EAGER), Rapid Response Research (RAPID), conference, and planning grants.

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY

This program provides educational opportunities for  Undergraduate Students. This program provides indirect funding for students at this level or focuses on educational developments for this group such as curricula development, training or retention. To inquire about possible funding opportunities not directly from NSF, please look at the active awards for this program.


HHMI

Howard Hughes Medical Institute Inclusive Excellence Initiative

    Letter of Intent: 7/31/19

    Pre-Proposal Deadline: 1/14/20

    Full Proposal Deadline: 12/1/20

Project Description: The dynamic demographics of the US population present a historic and compelling opportunity. All students, regardless of where they come from and where they are going, deserve a meaningful and positive experience in science through which they will better understand and engage in scientific thinking and discovery.  The quality of that experience is the responsibility of the faculty and administrators who play an essential role in defining an institution’s culture. 

Unfortunately, there exist substantial disparities between students who arrive at college via different pathways. Students who are first in their families to attend college, students who transfer from 2-year to 4-year schools, and students from racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups underrepresented in science are significantly less likely to complete the baccalaureate degree.

We aim to create a learning community of college and university faculty and administrators who are engaged in the continuing process of increasing their institution’s capacity for inclusion of all students. Each school in the community will commit to learning through reflection, sharing what is being learned, listening to feedback, and supporting other members of the community.


*Grants that Accept Proposals at Anytime